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StarKist Pleads Guilty To Price Fixing In Alleged Collusion In Canned Tuna Industry

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A StarKist brand product is seen on a grocery store shelf. Authorities say StarKist has agreed to plead guilty to price fixing as part of a broad collusion investigation of the industry.

Three companies — StarKist, Chicken of the Sea and Bumble Bee — are accused by the government of conspiring to keep their canned tuna prices high.

(Image credit: Lisa Poole/AP)

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CallMeWilliam
1 day ago
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diannemharris
1 day ago
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fxer
3 days ago
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COLLUSION FOUND, Russian ass looking Charlie Tuna
Bend, Oregon

Tax Revenue Is Meaningless

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Let’s conduct a thought experiment. Imagine that the government is a black box whose internal workings are completely opaque to us. We know that this black box can add money to the economy through spending or remove money from the economy through taxation. But we have no idea why the government is administering fiscal policy (spending and taxing) the way it is. This thought experiment allows us to consider the effects of fiscal policy without becoming distracted by its underlying politics.
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CallMeWilliam
12 days ago
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Dianne: Is this crazy?
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Go Register to Vote

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If you’re not yet registered to vote in America’s mid-term elections, there’s still time. This helpful post breaks down what you need to do in all 50 states.

Every election is important, but this one is even more critical than most. I urge you to get registered, then get to the polls on November 6th. Vote like the fate of the country depends on it, because it just might.

Link: https://www.theroot.com/make-this-go-viral-the-voter-registration-deadline-for-1829462310

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CallMeWilliam
16 days ago
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diannemharris
17 days ago
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“They’re Remorseful” vs. “He Was No Angel”

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This is how the criminal justice system functions:

Zachary Costin and Andrew Ward, both then 22, went to Colorado and bought 18 pounds of pot from an illegal grower. They hired another 22-year-old man to bring it back to Kentucky. Police say the man had done the same thing for them twice before. Police in Colorado later found and seized a large amount of marijuana, hashish, money and documents linked to Costin.

This time, though, the “mule” was stopped for speeding in Kansas, where police found and seized the marijuana. He was allowed to continue on to Lexington in return for cooperating with a police investigation. The man told Costin, Ward and Ethan Hatfield, 21, what had happened in Kansas and that he was cooperating with police. Hatfield, whose family has been associated with Rod Hatfield Chevrolet, and Costin were then fraternity brothers in UK’s chapter of Sigma Alpha Epsilon.

Costin asked the man to come to Hatfield’s home, a mansion valued at $2.5 million in McAtee Run, a gated subdivision off Tates Creek Road. He was led to the basement where Hatfield and Costin were accompanied by John Nathaniel “Porky” Cooper, 36, who introduced himself as the “person hired to kill you.”

They forced the man to take off all his clothes and snort a Xanax pill. For the next two hours, he was held against his will and tortured with a hammer, pliers and an AR-15 rifle stock. He told police the men also pointed handguns and a shotgun at him. After he agreed to pay them $45,000, he was allowed to shower and leave the house naked, but the men took his Armani watch, wallet and cell phone.

Cooper, Costin and Hatfield were indicted in April 2017 on kidnapping, robbery and assault charges. Costin and Ward were indicted on a charge of criminal conspiracy to traffic in more than five pounds of marijuana. But those charges were amended down, and the defendants pleaded guilty: Cooper, Costin and Hatfield to unlawful imprisonment, theft by unlawful taking and misdemeanor assault. Costin and Ward also pleaded guilty to conspiracy to traffic 8 ounces to 5 pounds of marijuana.

Fayette Circuit Judge Thomas Travis in May sentenced Costin to seven years, Cooper and Hatfield to five years and Ward to two years in prison. But between Aug. 7 and Sept. 10, Travis granted all four men “shock probation” — releasing them from jail in return for 15 hours of community service each year for five years.

Travis’ decision, which prosecutors didn’t oppose, came after defense attorneys filed papers saying their clients were remorseful, that they wanted to continue their education, return to their families. They claimed there was little chance the four young men would commit another crime.

Kentucky is one of a few states that allows shock probation. The idea is to give a second chance to offenders who might be “shocked” straight by a short stay behind bars.

The state, of course, keeps no statistics on the demographics of offenders who might be “shocked” straight.

Let’s also be clear; I doubt that a short stay behind bars can “shock” the stupid out of you.  Their co-conspirator did the stand-up thing of informing them that he was working with the police before they imprisoned him in the basement of the suburban mansion. Then they torture him, rob him, and let him go?  Did they think that without his cellphone he wouldn’t be able to get in contact with the cops?

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CallMeWilliam
29 days ago
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diannemharris
29 days ago
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tubaterry: https://twitter.com/CriminelleLaw/status/1037511306906099712 Reminds me of my mom...

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tubaterry:

https://twitter.com/CriminelleLaw/status/1037511306906099712

Reminds me of my mom getting remarried several years ago, for about a weekend - dude waited until after the wedding to tell her he expected her at waiting at home with dinner waiting when he finished work.

I dunno, like I get that this version of manhood is “normal” but goddamn is it the most brittle, contemptable fuckin thing

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CallMeWilliam
31 days ago
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We maintain a healthy competition on income and assets. I'm currently winning on income (hooray), and losing on assets (boo, debt). This competition means we strive for better paying jobs. That we love each other means we support each other in leaving bad jobs.
benzado
33 days ago
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It is useful for young men who think these things to read these reactions before they get too old to rethink them.
New York, NY (40.785018,-73.97
duerig
32 days ago
I don't know what is worse. The idea that your partner is somebody you are in competition with and whose strength intimidates rather than empowers you. Or the idea that 'teacher' and 'nurse', two highly-credentialed and highly intellectual disciplines are somehow non-intimidating because the practitioners don't 'think so much'. If any man confides this kind of feeling in a partner, it should be in the context of confessing a personal problem that they want to fix in themselves. This is just gobsmacking that it could be a normal reaction to wish that your partner wasn't successful.
diannemharris
32 days ago
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Offering a more progressive definition of freedom

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popular shared this story from kottke.org.

Pete Buttigieg is the mayor of South Bend, Indiana. He is a progressive Democrat, Rhodes scholar, served a tour of duty in Afghanistan during his time as mayor, and is openly gay. In a recent interview with Rolling Stone, Buttigieg talked about the need for progressives to recast concepts that conservatives have traditionally “owned” — like freedom, family, and patriotism — in more progressive terms.

You’ll hear me talk all the time about freedom. Because I think there is a failure on our side if we allow conservatives to monopolize the idea of freedom — especially now that they’ve produced an authoritarian president. But what actually gives people freedom in their lives? The most profound freedoms of my everyday existence have been safeguarded by progressive policies, mostly. The freedom to marry who I choose, for one, but also the freedom that comes with paved roads and stop lights. Freedom from some obscure regulation is so much more abstract. But that’s the freedom that conservatism has now come down to.

Or think about the idea of family, in the context of everyday life. It’s one thing to talk about family values as a theme, or a wedge — but what’s it actually like to have a family? Your family does better if you get a fair wage, if there’s good public education, if there’s good health care when you need it. These things intuitively make sense, but we’re out of practice talking about them.

I also think we need to talk about a different kind of patriotism: a fidelity to American greatness in its truest sense. You think about this as a local official, of course, but a truly great country is made of great communities. What makes a country great isn’t chauvinism. It’s the kinds of lives you enable people to lead. I think about wastewater management as freedom. If a resident of our city doesn’t have to give it a second thought, she’s freer.

Clean drinking water is freedom. Good public education is freedom. Universal healthcare is freedom. Fair wages are freedom. Policing by consent is freedom. Gun control is freedom. Fighting climate change is freedom. A non-punitive criminal justice system is freedom. Affirmative action is freedom. Decriminalizing poverty is freedom. Easy & secure voting is freedom. This is an idea of freedom I can get behind.

Tags: language   Pete Buttigieg   politics
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CallMeWilliam
52 days ago
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