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Workers are ghosting their employers like bad dates - The Washington Post

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Economists report that workers are starting to act like millennials on Tinder: They’re ditching jobs with nary a text.

“A number of contacts said that they had been ‘ghosted,’ a situation in which a worker stops coming to work without notice and then is impossible to contact,” the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago noted in December’s Beige Book, which tracks employment trends.

National data on economic “ghosting” is lacking. The term, which usually applies to dating, first surfaced in 2016 on Dictionary.com. But companies across the country say silent exits are on the rise.

Analysts blame America’s increasingly tight labor market. Job openings have surpassed the number of seekers for eight straight months, and the unemployment rate has clung to a 49-year low of 3.7 percent since September.

Janitors, baristas, welders, accountants, engineers — they’re all in demand, said Michael Hicks, a labor economist at Ball State University in Indiana. More people may opt to skip tough conversations and slide right into the next thing.

“Why hassle with a boss and a bunch of out-processing,” he said, “when literally everyone has been hiring?”

Recruiters at global staffing firm Robert Half have noticed a “ten to twenty percent increase” in ghosting over the past year, D.C. district president Josh Howarth said.

Applicants blow off interviews. New hires turn into no-shows. Workers leave one evening and never return.

“You feel like someone has a high level of interest only for them to just disappear,” Howarth said.

Over the summer, woes he heard from clients emerged in his own life. A job candidate for a recruiter role asked for a day to mull over an offer, saying she wanted to discuss the terms with her spouse.

Then she halted communication.

“In fairness,” Howarth said, “there are some folks who might have so many opportunities they’re considering they honestly forget.”

Keith Station, director of business relations at Heartland Workforce Solutions, which connects job hunters with companies in Omaha, said service workers in his area are most likely to skip out on low-paying service positions.

“People just fall off the face of the Earth,” he said of the area, which has an especially low unemployment rate of 2.8 percent.

Some Nebraska employers are trying to avoid unfilled shifts with apprentice programs that guarantee raises and additional training over time.

“Then you want to stay and watch your wage grow,” Station said.

Other recruitment businesses point to solutions from China, where ghosting took off during the past decade’s explosive growth.

“We generally make two offers for every job because somebody doesn’t show up,” said Rebecca Henderson, chief executive of Randstad Sourceright, a talent acquisition firm.

And if both hires stick around, she said, her multinational clients are happy to deepen the bench.

While ghosting in the United States does not yet require that level of backup planning, consultants urge employers to build meaningful relationships at every stage of the hiring process.

Someone who feels invested in an enterprise is less likely to bounce, write Melissa and Johnathan Nightingale, co-authors of “How F*cked Up Is Your Management?: An uncomfortable conversation about modern leadership.”

“Employees leave jobs that suck,” they said in an email. “Jobs where they’re abused. Jobs where they don’t care about the work. And the less engaged they are, the less need they feel to give their bosses any warning.”

Some employees are simply young and restless, said James Cooper, former manager of the Old Faithful Inn at Yellowstone Park, where he said people ghosted regularly.

A few of his staffers were college students who lived in park dormitories for the summer.

“My favorite,” he said, “was a kid who left a note on the floor in his dorm room that said ‘sorry bros, had to ghost.’ ”

Other ghosters describe an inner voice that just says: Nah.

Zach Keel, a 26-year-old server in Austin, made the call last year to flee a Texas bar-slash-cinema after realizing he would have to clean the place until sunrise. More work, he calculated, was always around the corner.

“I didn’t call,” Keel said. “I didn’t show up. I figured: No point in feeling guilty about something that wasn’t that big of an issue. Turnover is so high, anyway."

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CallMeWilliam
1 day ago
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diannemharris
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jepler
1 day ago
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"“In fairness,” Howarth said, “there are some folks who might have so many opportunities they’re considering they honestly forget.”" hahahaha
Earth, Sol system, Western spiral arm
acdha
1 day ago
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Who could possibly have predicted that showing scant loyalty and respect to staff would lead to them reciprocating?
Washington, DC
skorgu
1 day ago
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Arkansas’s Medicaid experiment has proved disastrous - The Washington Post

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This summer, Arkansas became the first state to require poor people to prove they’re employed to receive Medicaid.

Critics say the state is trying to save money on the backs of the poor. That’s nonsense, Arkansas officials reply. They want to help the poor. Backed by the Trump administration, they are inspiring slackers and moochers to climb the economic ladder.

Thirteen other states are pursuing similar policies. They’d do well to pause their plans. For many low-income families, the Arkansas experiment has already proved disastrous. More than 12,000 have been purged from the state Medicaid rolls since September — and not necessarily because they’re actually failing to work 80 hours a month, as the state requires.

Consider Adrian McGonigal, who is challenging the policy in federal court.

McGonigal, like most non-disabled, nonelderly Medicaid recipients, had a job. Full time, too, at a chicken plant. The plant’s chemicals sometimes aggravated his COPD, a chronic lung disease, but his employer accommodated the condition by moving him from processing to shipping.

More important, McGonigal’s prescription medication — funded by the state’s Medicaid expansion, since his job didn’t come with health insurance — kept his symptoms in check.

McGonigal was unclear about what he needed to do to report his work hours, or if he had to report at all. The new policy applies only to Medicaid expansion enrollees, but even most people in that group don’t have to frequently check in with the state (because of age, disability, state already has work information on file, etc.). Like many I spoke with, McGonigal says he got confusing and sometimes conflicting information from the state’s Department of Human Services, which told him to report online. He doesn’t have a cellphone or computer, so he borrowed his sister-in-law’s smartphone.

“I thought that everything was good,” he told me in an interview for The Post and “PBS NewsHour.” “I thought it was just a one-time deal that you reported it, and then that was it.”

It wasn’t.

The state wanted him to report monthly . He learned this only when his pharmacy told him his insurance had been canceled. After that, he couldn’t afford his medication. His COPD flared up and he landed in the emergency room. And he missed lots of work.

“I tried to stick it out, and still go to work, but I just couldn’t do it,” he said. Ultimately, reluctantly, his supervisor let him go.

In other words: A policy intended to help people get jobs instead cost McGonigal his.

This was predictable. A Hamilton Project report found that the preponderance of evidence suggests Medicaid has little or positive effects on labor-force supply. For many families, safety-net services support work, rather than discourage it.

There are other reasons programs such as Arkansas’s are unlikely to improve work outcomes.

The lives of low-income Americans can be precarious. They may change addresses and phone numbers often — which explains why other Arkansans I interviewed, including at a Little Rock homeless shelter, said they learned about the work reporting system only after their insurance was already at risk.

Arkansas’s overall unemployment rate is low. But in rural areas, jobs still can be few and far between. Many workers don’t have control over their hours, either.

Consider another plaintiff, Anna Book, who is homeless. A restaurant dishwasher, Book just barely meets the state’s 80-hour monthly minimum. But if business is light, she might lose a shift.

She has already fallen below the threshold once; after three strikes, she’ll be barred from Medicaid until the following January.

Medicaid recipients can’t directly report over the phone, in person or by mail. Like McGonigal, Book doesn’t have a computer. She designated a pastor to log her work hours for her.

The state made reporting online-only to avoid hiring more staff. (It also didn’t allocate any additional dollars to help enrollees find work.) Officials did this even though Arkansas has the lowest level of household Internet access in the country, and the online portal doesn’t work well on smartphones. Once, when I tried it, I got an error message saying my phone’s browser was “not compatible.” The next day, it was mysteriously compatible again.

Most indefensibly, the website shuts down every single night between 9 p.m. and 7 a.m. for “scheduled maintenance.”

No wonder 80 percent of those required to report work hours or exemptions each month are reporting nothing at all.

I asked Cindy Gillespie, director of the state’s DHS, how confident she was that all — or even most — of the thousands of people kicked off Medicaid were not working and were insufficiently motivated to work. She said she’s confident anyone improperly removed from the rolls could easily get their situation reversed.

McGonigal’s experience suggests otherwise.

Last month, his legal-aid lawyers persuaded DHS to grant him a “good cause” exemption and a chance to re-enroll in Medicaid. But because of additional red tape, he still hasn’t gotten any of his medication. It’s been six weeks.

Meanwhile, the chicken plant says he’s welcome back. But only, McGonigal says, when — and if — he’s healthy enough to work.

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CallMeWilliam
24 days ago
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Socialized medicine is the only way to save the day. Say that dirty word: socialism!
diannemharris
24 days ago
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acdha
24 days ago
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I know I should be numb to this by now but there’s such offensive hypocrisy on display in the fact that everyone involved in taking health insurance away from people proudly calls themselves pro-life.

It takes a certain kind of evil to come up with things like requiring the working poor to register with a website which is only available from 7am to 9pm, too.
Washington, DC

The Proudly Filthy ‘Beetlejuice’ Is A Transcendent Film-To-Musical Adaptation

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Ben Franklin famously wrote that only death and taxes are certain. In the grand scheme of biological history, the latter is a recent development. Most organisms—shrubs, cats, billionaires—have managed to happily avoid them. Death, on the other hand, greeted our earliest single-celled ancestor and will whisk away the very last cockroach. This stubborn fact is the premise of a gleefully ribald new musical, based on Tim Burton’s immortal sophomore film.

Regular theatergoers have good reason to be dubious of screen-to-stage translations. For every supernova (Hairspray, The Producers, Billy Elliot), there’s a corresponding black hole (Carrie, Big, Footloose). Elaborate adaptations are, for the most part, vehicles for nostalgia. They’re often little more than proven commodities, known brands. In most cases, the original movie outshines its theatrical byproduct. Why would anyone pay triple digits for a live experience when a better one awaits, with cheap microwave popcorn, in the living room?

Perhaps because the best translations aren’t mere rehashes draped in spectacle. Sometimes a show deepens its source material, something akin to a philosophical reboot, one that also pays homage to a beloved film. The Broadway-bound production currently haunting the National Theatre comes tantalizingly close to such transcendence. It’s called Beetlejuice. Beetlejuice? Beetlejuice.

Having seen the show twice, I still conjure its titular demon, despite many reservations. I first experienced this highly polished extravaganza during previews. Full disclosure: I gaped at its showstoppers, laughed a lot, and cried here and there. I didn’t recognize a difference two weeks later on opening night, beside my less-enthusiastic reaction, which was more intellectual than emotional: Aha became huh.

The problem here isn’t breadth, but depth. On the surface, Beetlejuice is exactly what you think you want. Director Alex Timbers delivers the phantasmagorical goods. With help from David Korins’ stunning sets, Ken Posner’s metamorphic lighting, and Michael Curry and Jeremy Chernick’s extraordinary puppetry and special effects, Beetlejuice is brought to vivid life. Danny Elfman’s classic score is evoked, with more than just a wink, as we find our seats before the curtain opens and during intermission.

The story matches its setting: slightly askew but recognizable. Beetlejuice (Alex Brightman, a foul-mouthed, pansexual Puck) graduates from Michael Keaton’s supporting role to a Cabaret-like emcee who’s omnipresent, both an observer and a participant. The show begins with a funeral ripped from the pages of Edward Gorey, with a glib opening number called “The Whole Being Dead Thing.” Love him or hate him, Beetlejuice is the embodiment of a gravelly, Apatovian bro. Sex dominates his brain, and his mind is pure id.

Lydia (the spectacular Sophia Anne Caruso) is still deep in mourning for her late mother (which she translates to song in the Avril Lavigne-inspired “Dead Mom”). She eventually befriends a pair of square ghosts (Kerry Butler and Rob McClure) stuck in afterlife stasis. Her patrician father (Adam Dannheisser) and his New Age companion (Leslie Kritzer, fabulous here) invade and remake a quaint dwelling outside of New York City formerly owned by the ghosts, who are not too thrilled to find themselves replaced in their own home. Like Burton’s film, Beetlejuice becomes a tale of exorcism, of the living from a place of the dead.

If Eddie Perfect (music and lyrics) and Scott Brown and Anthony King (who co-wrote the book) studied a holy text, it wasn’t the Handbook for the Recently Deceased, but The Book of Mormon. Beetlejuice is proudly filthy, and at times genuinely heartbreaking. But the only songs that are hummable have existed for decades. The proof is in the bathroom. During intermission, the guys around me were whistling Harry Belafonte. And yet, once it moves to Broadway, this version of Beetlejuice will live to see another day: oh, no doubt.

Beetlejuice runs at the National Theatre through Nov. 18, tickets $54-$114. Runtime about 2 hours and 40 minutes with intermission.

The post The Proudly Filthy ‘Beetlejuice’ Is A Transcendent Film-To-Musical Adaptation appeared first on DCist.

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CallMeWilliam
39 days ago
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We were singing COME MR TALLYMAN TALLY ME BANANAS for hours afterwards, but none of the music omusical.
diannemharris
39 days ago
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StarKist Pleads Guilty To Price Fixing In Alleged Collusion In Canned Tuna Industry

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A StarKist brand product is seen on a grocery store shelf. Authorities say StarKist has agreed to plead guilty to price fixing as part of a broad collusion investigation of the industry.

Three companies — StarKist, Chicken of the Sea and Bumble Bee — are accused by the government of conspiring to keep their canned tuna prices high.

(Image credit: Lisa Poole/AP)

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CallMeWilliam
54 days ago
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fxer
55 days ago
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COLLUSION FOUND, Russian ass looking Charlie Tuna
Bend, Oregon

Tax Revenue Is Meaningless

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Let’s conduct a thought experiment. Imagine that the government is a black box whose internal workings are completely opaque to us. We know that this black box can add money to the economy through spending or remove money from the economy through taxation. But we have no idea why the government is administering fiscal policy (spending and taxing) the way it is. This thought experiment allows us to consider the effects of fiscal policy without becoming distracted by its underlying politics.
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CallMeWilliam
65 days ago
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Dianne: Is this crazy?
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Go Register to Vote

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If you’re not yet registered to vote in America’s mid-term elections, there’s still time. This helpful post breaks down what you need to do in all 50 states.

Every election is important, but this one is even more critical than most. I urge you to get registered, then get to the polls on November 6th. Vote like the fate of the country depends on it, because it just might.

Link: https://www.theroot.com/make-this-go-viral-the-voter-registration-deadline-for-1829462310

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CallMeWilliam
69 days ago
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diannemharris
70 days ago
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